Document://Bimblebox, Vanishing Food Bowls, Jill Sampson

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

In ‘Vanishing Food Bowls’ silk bowls imprinted with plants from the Bimblebox Nature Refuge are suspended into the top of ghost coolamons woven in wire.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

photo by Mel de Ruyter

photo by Mel de Ruyter

 

These wire coolamons almost float above a map of Queensland.  Along one side of this map are images of cross sections of coral luminescence bands extracted from long living corals on the Great Barrier Reef.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

A plastic layer forms an oily, artificial surface over Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef as an analogy to the dangers of an increased number of coal carrying container ships.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

When the heavy rains come to Central Queensland the floodwaters from Bimblebox Nature Refuge drain into the Belyando River.  The Belyando River eventually drains into the Burdekin River, many hundreds of kilometres to the coast.  When the floodwaters reach the ocean fresh water spills out over the Great Barrier Reef for many kilometres, carrying silt from inland Australia.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

Each time silt flows over the reef the coral builds a layer of growth incorporating the silt laden fresh water.  These layers become luminescent bands which can be read as a weather time line by scientists.  Long living corals on the reef contain a record of flood events in Queensland over their lifetime.  An archive of weather records is contained in corals reaching back further than 400 years.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

400 years of weather patterns from long living coral links back to the Bimblebox trees, helping to date their cycles of birth and death.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

Trees at the Bimblebox Nature Refuge take a long time to grow, but many are very old, reaching back long before European colonisation.

Vanishing Food Bowls, detail

Trees at Bimblebox Nature Refuge germinate during several years of wet weather, while many years of drought will kill mature trees.  The time between germination cycles can be so long that the people who live in this area can go through their working lives not seeing the ironbark trees germinate.

This reminds us how easy it would be to lose entire ecosystems in one  generation…

Vanishing Food Bowls

photo by Mel de Ruyter

photo by Mel de Ruyter

Photos by Jill Sampson unless stated otherwise

2 responses to “Document://Bimblebox, Vanishing Food Bowls, Jill Sampson

  1. Jill, that is wonderful. With your simple floating food bowls you have shown the folly of destroying Bimblebox Nature Refuge and the consequences that follow on. It gave me goosebumps. I am really looking forward to seeing the whole exhibition when it is on the mainland. Thank you.

  2. Hey, Jill, a wonderful connection between the trees and the coral. Yep, Maureen is right, it will be great to see all the new work for the big show against big coal.

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